Will Blog For Wine and Cheese

You Know You Love Me

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Don’t read without a tissue

awanderingspirit:

I don’t talk about this much or ever but…
13 years ago this January I was diagnosed with Acute Myeloid Leukemia M5 the most aggressive form of cancer/Leukemia there is! I had 2 months to live and 3% chance to make it all this 3 months after I turned 21. The thing that bothers me the most is that out of 14 people including myself on the 7th NE floor (cancer ward) I am the only one who walk away and I watch as most of them passed. And add on top of that yesterday I was told that the Doctor who saved my life and had been seeing since day 1 died in June of cancer.  I really was hoping that someday he could meet my daughter and that I could get a real chance to thank him for all that he did for me…  I will miss him a lot.  
It breaks my heart that Chris had to lose yet another wonderful person in his life. So much that we have in our life (Chris, his health, our family, our daughter, etc.) is because of this amazing doctor that saved his life. Not only was he just a great guy, he was brilliant, yet among the most humble people I’ve ever met (brilliance and amazing bedside manner don’t always go hand in hand). We are glad to have known him, but so sad he is gone.

Filed under Irony cancer sucks AML gratitude is the word of the day

1,120 notes

People get really irritated by mental illness. “Just fucking get it together! Suck it up, man!” I had a breakdown, and a spiritual friend came to visit me in the psych ward. And they said, “You need to get out of here. Because this is the story you’re telling yourself. You know, Patch Adams has this great work-group camp where you can learn how to really celebrate life.”

It’s something people are so powerless over, and so often they want to make it your fault. It’s nobody’s fault. I started thinking of suicide when I was 10 years old—I can’t believe that that’s somebody’s fault. Like, “Oh, you’re just an attention getter.” Mental illness isn’t seen as an illness, it’s seen as a choice.

Yeah. I have a joke about how people don’t talk about mental illness the way they do other regular illnesses. “Well, apparently Jeff has cancer. Uh, I have cancer. We all have cancer. You go to chemotherapy you get it taken care of, am I right? You get back to work.” Or: “I was dating this chick, and three months in, she tells me that she wears glasses, and she’s been wearing contact lenses all this time. She needs help seeing. I was like, listen, I’m not into all that Western medicine shit. If you want to see, then work at it. Figure out how not to be so myopic. You know?”

Maria Bamford (via thekateblack)

As someone who works in the mental health field and specifically with kids, this is incredibly important. People (and sometimes parents) just don’t understand that it’s not a choice.

(via redcatinsanfrancisco)

THIS

(via avenue-adventure)

Filed under apparently i'm all about the reblog today

34 notes

This little Munchkin was 5 months old on Saturday…I can’t believe it. I can’t believe that only 5 months ago she wasn’t part of our lives and now we don’t know what we would do without her. She is endlessly entertaining and it’s fascinating to watch her grow!

This little Munchkin was 5 months old on Saturday…I can’t believe it. I can’t believe that only 5 months ago she wasn’t part of our lives and now we don’t know what we would do without her. She is endlessly entertaining and it’s fascinating to watch her grow!

Filed under LJ

133 notes

We spend a lot of time judging women for the choices that they make, or even the choices thrust upon them. We nod when victims of domestic violence apologize for “the role” they played in their assaults. We want celebrities whose private, revealing photographs have been stolen and distributed to be sorry for having taken private photographs in the first place. We expect rape victims to be sorry for being raped—this is the crux of Sarah Silverman’s whole “rape jokes” bit. Women who get catcalled should have walked somewhere else, women who attract unwanted attention should be sorry for being so attractive, and on and on and on. Women say sorry when there is literally nothing to be sorry about. And some of that, as has been discussed, is a survival mechanism in a culture that punishes those who dare to not be sorry for any of the above. Women who do what they have to do to get by shouldn’t be sorry about it, even if what they have to do is say sorry all the time.

But what if we weren’t sorry, not for any of it? What if it were fine to be not sorry?
Jessica Goldstein, In ‘Wild,’ Reese Witherspoon Is The Perfect Imperfect Feminist (via annaverity)

(via mavieenrose)